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    Charlie Paris Concordia

    Charlie Paris Concordia

    Charlie Paris Concordia

    The Charlie Paris Concordia is available in many different colors, sizes, and movements, and this Tundra version is unique and special in a few ways compared to the rest of the collection. Charlie Paris hails from France of course and has been operating since 2014. Almost 10 years ago, yet someone they have flown under my radar up until recently. The French brand makes both men’s and women’s watches and has quite a few different collections. This Concordia is using a Soprod P024 automatic movement, is available on either a bracelet or strap, and at least 10 different dial and bezel combos and even bezel-less options as well. I chose this Tundra version for review to showcase something different from the black or blue models most see in a vintage style diver like this, and because of the dial texture, this specific model has. At $920, it is pricey, especially considering the case design does strongly resemble a Tudor Black Bay, and the bracelet could be a lot better.

    Specifications:

    • 40mm Stainless Steel Case
    • 47.5mm Lug to Lug
    • 12.5mm Thick
    • 20mm Lug Width
    • 155 Grams in Weight
    • Screw Down Crown
    • Domed Box Sapphire Crystal
    • Non-magnetic shielding ISO764
    • Aluminum Bezel Insert
    • Swiss automatic Movement Soprod caliber P024
    • See-Through Case Back
    • 300 Meters Water Resistant

    Price, Approximately $922

    https://charlie-paris.com/en/collections/concordia

    Charlie Paris Concordia

    On paper, the Charlie Paris Concordia does seem like a great offering, with domed box sapphire, a textured dial, applied indices, a Swiss movement, and being assembled in France. And all those things are true, but it doesn’t tell the true story. To start, the case design while overall a vintage 60s diver, especially from the front, but when you turn it to the side, you see a case that very much looks like the Black Bay homage. Now the rest of the watch doesn’t look like a Black Bay at all, but we all know a BB case side when you see one. The case sides also add in this bead-blasted frosted texture, which does look good and holds up well to scratches and marks, and matches the aluminum bezel insert as well, but it’s an odd choice for a watch that is brushed and polished everywhere else.

    Charlie Paris Concordia

    The crown is unique though, and I do quite like it. The tapering design coupled with the enamel inserts and the engraved pattern on the face, all work together, and winding and manipulating the crown feels nice and solid. The bezel on the other hand, a stainless bezel with an anodized aluminum insert is just fine. It’s so thin that it is a little hard to grip, especially with larger hands, but it does function well, and it does look good overall.

    If you want something other than a plain matte or sunburst dial, the Tundra version of the Charlie Paris Concordia is the way to go. The dial looks like sand, or maybe more correctly, a stucco cement pattern, and it’s pretty pleasing to the eye and not overly aggressive. The rest of the dial is pretty standard fare, applied indices, date at 6, and brand and model name. Something I didn’t touch on in the video is the logo. Obviously, this is very subjective (as are many parts of a review) but I don’t care for the bird logo. It looks like it belongs on a fashion watch, and the Charlie Paris font is pretty mundane as well.

    Charlie Paris Concordia

    Around the back, you can see the Soprod P024 Automatic Swiss movement. If you are not familiar with Soprod, they are part of the Festina group and they have been in the game for a good while now, at least since 2004, and this movement is pretty much a clone of the ETA 2824. Like the ETA it does have a low 38-hour power reserve and accuracy can be anywhere from -1 (doubtful) to +14 spd. This movement, like the ETA and the SW200-1, is rather plain, and not decorated, but the rotor here does have the Charlie Paris engraving. In the photo below, you can also see this bracelet utilizes quick-release end links, and the bracelet is where the issues with this watch arise. It also states made in France on the website, and I want to clarify this means (as it states on their website) is assembled in France. I will assume it is manufactured in China.

    At $922, the price as I write this review, you would expect a pretty nice bracelet, especially these days. What you get instead is one of the most generic oyster bracelets available and a clasp that belongs on a watch that would cost much less, like $600 less. There is just no other way to say it. This bracelet and clasp are not up to par with the watch case and needs a major upgrade. The Charlie Paris Concordia series is also available on a canvas strap (and one upcoming model with a leather strap). The canvas strap which you can see in the video review is not exactly great either, (kind of thin and cheap feeling with a cheap buckle) and is only $50 less than the bracelet version.

    On my 7 1/2 inch (19.05cm) wrist, this 40 mm piece looks the part but with the subpar bracelet, it doesn’t feel very great. Both the bracelet and strap do have quick-release bars, which you can never be sure how they will hold up in the future, but like with any watch with unappealing straps, you can always put on one of your own, that is if you like the watch head itself. 
    I think the Charlie Paris Concordia is an attractive piece, and regardless of how you feel about the case being so similar to the Black Bay, the watch does have some unique features and can be a great everyday piece, and should be able to handle some water if you find it really necessary as it’s listed as 300m water resistant. The bracelet and strap issues are really hard to ignore though given the price, I mean this is basically a $1000 watch after tax and shipping unless you are able to find some discounts. Hopefully, the brand can up its bracelet and straps and live up to its price tag or lower its prices to be more in line with the overall quality.

    Charlie Paris Concordia

    Marloe Sceptre October

    Marloe Sceptre October

    The Marloe Sceptre October is one of the latest watches from Malroe Watch Company, a British-based microbrand that popped on the scene in 2015. Since then, they have created quite a few models and have their own distinct style, and have created their own niche. You see, Marloe doesn’t really have a standard dive watch most brands produce, they make watches that can go in the water, but their style leans more towards boating or sport watches, or in the case of the Atlantic models, pilot style watches, but even those have Marloe’s distinct twist. This new Sceptre model is quite interesting for a few reasons. It has a bezel and a screw-down crown but isn’t a dive watch, but more like a watch one could wear every day when you are out boating, hiking, or just casually, and this particular one, the October, has a funky periscope sight dial, along with a Miyota 9039 movement, all for under $500.

    Specifications:

    • 42mm Diameter
    • 22mm Lug Width
    • 48mm Lug to Lug
    • Dual Textured Bespoke Designed Case With
    • Screw Down Crown
    • Bi-Directional Bezel with 60 Clicks
    • Sapphire Crystal With Dual Side Anti-Reflective coating
    • Multi-layer dial with floating luminous pontoons
    • Divider hands, hairline running seconds hands
    • Luminous hands and markings
    • Miyota 9039 Automatic Movement
    • 76g
    • 20 ATM
    • 2-year warranty
    • Country of Origin- China

    Price $430

    https://www.marloewatchcompany.com/collections/sceptre

    There are four versions of the Marloe Sceptre, but I will mostly concentrate on the October version here, as that is what I have in hand, but if you do go to the website, you will see the other versions all have matching dials and the case finishes to get changed up depending on which dial you choose. This version is all blasted, as is one other I believe and the other two are mostly polished with some brushed accents. This case is definitely unique, and it follows the Solent model I reviewed a few years ago, but they took this model in a more rugged direction, both the more aggressive sloping lugs and turbine-inspired bezel grip, and like I said, on this one, all bead blasted finish.
    The bezel is bi-directional and the grip allows for easy purchase, and the crown does screw down as well. I wish the crown grip matched the bezel, but both function very well, and the crown is large enough at 6.7mm to use, even with bigger fingers I like how they did a brushed finish on the top part of the crown, just to make the logo stand out a little better. The top of the crown is also concave, which does nothing for functionality, but it is quite attractive looking. The case feels very solid and while it looks simple, it does have some nice lines, and that turbine bezel is probably just the best-looking aspect of the case, it is hard not to stare at it and admire its beauty. And no, nothing is sharp about that bezel at all, it is very smooth to the touch.

    Now when it come to the dial of the Marloe Sceptre October, I’m going to take some text from the Marloe website, to explain what their intentions were with this particular piece.
    The design of the October’s printing on the main dial is different from the other designs, featuring a reticle sight with a subtle gloss print at the cardinal points on the main dial. This mimics the measurement scale of the periscopes used by submarines to remain sub-surface but observe what’s happening above the waves.

    Marloe Sceptre October

    Now for the most part, because of the domed sapphire crystal and the blue AR coating, you don’t see the lines on the dial unless you are really looking at a certain angle to are up close with to the dial. It is very subtle and to that point, I almost wish they were more prominent, as it really does look like a clean minimalist dial most of the time, which is fine and is a good look, but knowing there is something printed on the dial you can’t always see, it’s a bit of an annoyance. That is very subjective of course. The rest of the dial is very nice, I love the orange text, it contrasts nicely with the black/brown hue of the dial, and the floating indices and the white chapter ring, really set this dial off, and the contrasting white and black hands make this dial very easy to read.

    Marloe Sceptre October

    On the back, you will see the Miyota 9039, yes, can you believe it, a microbrand actually put in a no-date movement, in a no date watch, and this unique case and dial design, coupled with the great finishing, still comes in at $430, so yes it can be done. No phantom date position on the crown, and even though I find Miyota movements to be awfully plain looking and would prefer a solid case back, I know many love to look at the movement no matter what it is, and for you folks, here it is.

    But, as usual, not everything is perfect and my one little gripe about the Marloe Sceptre October is the strap you see it on. Before I get to that, let me state that you can choose from 12 different straps on their website for this watch. Yes, 12. 2 different colored worn canvas straps with leather backings (mine is olive canvas), multiple colors of rubber straps, horween leather straps with the ribbed design, thick, rough-looking leather straps, and even a metal bracelet (though the metal bracelet doesn’t seem to be blasted and it looks kinda generic). But back to my gripe. It is simply too short. It’s 110/80mm, I am in the last hole on my 7 1/2 inch (19.05cm) wrist, and I just wish it was around 120 or 130/80, as then it could fit a larger wrist, and more importantly a wider range of wrists. This isn’t exactly a small wearing watch either, and in the world of the guys out there with wrists even larger than mine who still want a 42mm and upsized watch, this strap size would be very disappointing to them, especially because it is an extremely well made and attractive canvas strap.

    Marloe Sceptre October

    And lastly, we get to the lume and I didn’t expect much here, and while the hands glow bright enough, those small floating indices are just that, small, and there is not a lot of room for lume compound to be applied, so the glow is nice and the lume looks nicely applied and even, just don’t expect a torch here.

    As I stated at the beginning of this Marloe Sceptre October review, this is a very cool piece, it is unique and distinct and really sets itself apart from so many other microbrands, especially competing brands at this price point. At $430, you mostly see very inspired or homage pieces, or just another dive watch, so when you see a brand really going outside the box, yet still making a wearable and attractive piece, it definitely attracts attention. I do wish they would add a few other dial options, maybe somewhere the dials are more vibrant or sunburst or even a gravel textured dial if you will, and of course, yes I want to see longer straps, at least longer canvas straps, as I can not confirm the length of the other straps offered. One more thing, yes, the brand is in based in Britain, yet to my knowledge, they are not made or Assembled there, only designed. Manufacturing takes place most likely in Asia, as is the case for many microbrands.

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    Here we are with another version of this iconic watch, the Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf. Yes, Zodiac has jumped into the ceramic watch cases, as they have been trying to expand their lineup this past year, using different materials for both the dials and cases. Meteorite, titanium, and now ceramic. High gloss, all-black ceramic with a deep blue dial, but this one has a unique twist, the ceramic case is over a steel exoskeleton, which is pretty interesting, and makes this watch quite unique. Limited to 500 pieces and priced at $1,695, quite a good price considering this is still a COSC-certified piece.

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    Specifications:

    • 40mm
    • 316 Steel and Ceramic Case 
    • 13.5mm Thick
    • 20mm Lug Width
    • 48mm Lug to Lug
    • 94.8 Grams in Weight
    • STP1-11 Automatic Movement
    • Sapphire Crystal
    • Ceramic Bezel Insert
    • 200m Water Resistant
    • Tropic Rubber Strap
    • Made in Switzerland

    Price $1,695

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf Webpage

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    Even though this is the same design that Zodiac has been using for years now, there is still a lot to unpack here. Yes, the specs look pretty similar to all of their other offerings, but then you see ceramic. But not just ceramic, ceramic and stainless steel. I admit, that had me scratching my head as well when the Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf arrived as well. Ceramic is not a new case material, in fact, many brands have been using ceramic for decades now, with IWC and Rado introducing it in the 80s. These days, you can even get a ceramic watch for $300, even from Fossil, Zodiac’s parent brand.

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    Now that $300 Fossil is quartz, has a mineral crystal, and is only 5atm water resistant, so not in the same league as this Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf, but the fact remains you can get a “cheap” ceramic watch (with a ceramic bracelet as well) if you desire one. Unlike the fossil, the case of this ceramic diver is a two-piece case, with a ceramic case over a steel case, or at least a steel exoskeleton with steel lugs and a case back that is DLC coated. I am told it is not a coating, it is an actual case over a case and the goal here is to give the ceramic case strength to prevent it from being brittle and smashing into pieces if and when it is dropped or banged into something hard. Ceramic is extremely scratch resistant and very fade resistant as well, but because of how hard it is, it can be brittle. How this ceramic/steel case mashup actually holds up, only time will tell with the 500 buyers who got one. I personally would still take good care of this watch as you would with any other ceramic piece. After all, $1700 is not a small amount of cash, especially these days.

    The dial is special on this limited model as well, even though at first glance it looks similar to the other Super Sea Wolf models. A domed sapphire crystal sits atop a dark blue dial, and the dial itself is unique in that it is lightly textured, but seems to have a slight gradient to it. Working with the domed sapphire, it creates a sunray pattern effect, but it is not an actual sunray dial, at least not what I consider one. The texture is hard to see unless you get close up, normally it just appears to be a dark blue dial. The minute hand is done in black as are all the applied indices, and it is a really nice detail that matches the black of the ceramic case, and topping it all off is a grey chapter ring.

    The dial text on the other hand, well is something I have complained about on all of the Sea Wolf models, and unfortunately nothing has changed on this Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf. Some may not care about this at all and just say I am nitpicking, but the unmatched text font, which is quite large for a small dial such as this, just doesn’t look right. It reminds me of Christopher Ward and their logo issues that they had for years, which only got corrected within the past two years finally, though it has not made its way to all models yet. I hope Zodiac takes this feedback as constructive and maybe the designers can do a more cohesive and appropriately sized font on future models.

    Looking over the rest of the watch, this Super Sea Wolf is equipped with the STP1-11 movement, Fossil’s own movement and this one is a certified chronometer, which does play into the higher price than the other versions of this model. While I have never had an issue myself with this movement or noticed an issue with this example, over the many Zodiac reviews I have done over the years, the comments about the movement are inevitable. Basically, crown and winding issues are the main complaints. I have always stated I am not one to wind my watch, I am a shake-and-go type of guy, always have been, so that could be the main reason I have not encountered this issue. Hopefully, Fossil rectifies this in the near future.

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    To wrap this all up, this limited Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf is quite the attractive piece, and when compared to all the other versions of this 40mm compression model, I believe this is the greatest-looking one in the bunch. That is surprising, considering I am not into highly polished glossy pieces normally, but the deep black of this ceramic just looks fantastic, and in combination with the dark blue dial, it is a fantastic-looking piece. The lume is good enough, not great, just as it has been on recent Zodiac models, and at $1700 I would have wished they would have included one of their new rubber dive straps over this tropic rubber, as they look and feel much more premium to me. With only 500 of this version, few will be able to get their hands on one, but I am betting Zodiac will make some different ceramic pieces in the future, especially if these end up selling well.

    Zodiac Ceramic Super Sea Wolf

    RZE Ascentus GMTRZE Ascentus GMT

    The latest Microbrand to release a GMT, and I have a feeling this RZE Ascentus GMT is going to be quite popular. Available in 4 colors, azure blue, black, white, and medallion yellow, this 40mm GMT is attractive, has a beautiful and easy-to-read dial, and an all-new bracelet from RZE, that they dub the HEX links. It is all titanium again as well, keeping this watch svelte and lightweight, so easily wearable for a lot of wrists. The movement is the Seiko NH34 GMT, which keeps the price down as this one is under $600, coming in currently at $600.

    Specifications

    • Case: Bead-blasted Grade 2 Titanium with UltraHex™ Coating (up to ~1200Hv hardness)
    • Case Size: 40mm
    • Case Thickness: 13mm
    • Lug size: 20mm
    • Lug to lug: 46mm
    • Weight: 90-110 grams
    • Movement: SII NH34 Automatic GMT Movement
    • Water Resistance: 200m(660ft)/20ATM
    • Bezel: Unidirectional 120-clicks rotating black DLC 24hrs bezel.
    • Crown: Screw-down crown with custom reverse engraved logo
    • Lens: Sapphire crystal with inner-side Super-AR
    • Bracelet: Hex-Link bracelet coated with UltraHex™
    • Case Back: Screw-down solid titanium case-back with Viton® gasket

    Price $550

    https://www.rzewatches.com/pages/rze-ascentus-gmt

    The RZE Ascentus GMT keeps the same case as the Resolute, Endeavor, and Super Compressor, all titanium, lots of angles, very comfortable, and low profile. This is basically the Endeavor Diver but now adds the GMT complication. The crown is still screwed down and the water resistance is 200m. Weirdly though, the bezel is unidirectional and not bi-directional, and thinking about this some more, it is probably the same bezel from the Endeavour, which is most likely a cost-cutting measure. Still, I understand it, but most would probably prefer a bi-directional bezel when looking for a GMT watch.

    Another carryover from the previous models is the hands and indices of the RZE Ascentus GMT. With the exception of the yellow GMT hand, the dial is the same as on the Endeavor and Super Compressor, with the granite dial texture, and the elongated indices, which have become a signature for RZE. I love the framed date window, and that the date wheel matches the color of the dial. Speaking of dial color, I consider this less teal or turquoise, especially compared to how it looks on the RZE website. In person, it is much more of an icy blue color, with really no hint of green.

    RZE Ascentus GMT

    The case design, again, is from previous models I have reviewed, but it is a great case design, unique with all the angles and sharp lines, and of course, it is titanium and hard-coated, so it is lightweight and has some decent scratch resistance. 200m of water resistance is still here, and the case along with the sapphire crystal is still pretty thin, and at 40mm and a crown that really does get covered by the crown guards, this is a very slim and not bulky watch all around, especially on my 7 1/2 (19.05cm) wrist.

    RZE Ascentus GMT

    RZE Ascentus GMT

    When it comes to the movement, the RZE Ascentus GMT is using the Seiko SII NH34 movement, and much like the ETA 2892 or the SW200 series of GMT movements, this is not a TRUE GMT. Now, Miyota has released a true GMT, meaning it has a jumping hour hand, which many consider the real way a GMT should work. At $550, many have wondered why RZE didn’t use this new Miyota 9075 movement as apparently, Zelos will be coming out with one soon at the $500 price point (I imagine this will be a launch price special). Basically, Zelos has the buying power that RZE at this point does not and the Miyota movement is also pretty scarce. I’m not too hung up on how to set a GMT, but I am also not the target audience either. That said, I am looking forward to the 9075 and reviewing a watch with it soon. 
    Another new feature of the RZE Ascentus GMT is the new HEX bracelet, a 5-link titanium bracelet, with the same hard coating as the case. The clasp is stainless steel though and I am not sure if the clasp has a hard coating or not, but regardless, this is a very nice-looking bracelet that is smooth and article and feels very good on the wrist. It is also a good change from the previous models that use this case, and I hope to see this bracelet used in future models as well. If for some reason this new bracelet doesn’t do it for you, it does have quick-release pins and is easily removed.

    RZE Ascentus GMT

    While not an entirely new watch, the addition of the GMT movement, and the new bracelet make the RZE Ascentus GMT a nice refresh of the Endeavor models of watches and get the brand some more life out of this case and dial design. I am very fond of RZE watches and the aesthetic of this model is no exception, I just wish this was available in a 42 or 43mm. I know many are more than fine with the 40mm, but I wish for it to be larger. Hopefully, RZE realizes they are missing out on sales to guys with larger wrists or tastes for bigger watches. Other than that, this is another great-looking piece, and as seen below, looks just as good in the dark as it does in the light.

    RZE Ascentus GMT

    Winfield Apex

    Have you ever said to yourself, I’m sick of dive watches but still want something rugged and functional while still being affordable? That’s where the Winfield Apex comes in. Born out of a desire to create something hard-use and capable, while still being attainable by both collectors and just someone needing a good watch, and assembled in the USA. Yes, Winfield does hail from Maryland but the watches are built and tested by Lum-tec, so even though Winfield is a newer watch brand, you can be assured the pieces are well put together by OG’s in the microbrand watch world. This Winfield Apex is their latest model, similar to past models with a slightly different color scheme and a countdown timing bezel for those of us that don’t dive and want to time that bbq on the grill the old-fashioned way.

    Specifications:

    • 41mm Stainless Steel Case
    • 42mm Bezel
    • 13mm Thick
    • 48mm Lug to Lug
    • 20mm Lug Width
    • 111 Grams in Weight 
    • Sapphire Crystal
    • 100m Water Resistance
    • Seiko SII NH35 Automatic Movement 
    • Choice of Straps
    • Canvas Travel Pouch
    • Manufactured in Asia and Assembled
    • In the United States by Lum-Tec

    Price $445 ($399 Holiday Sale At Time of Publishing)

    https://winfieldwatch.com

    Now I am not about to pretend these types of watches do not already exist. Sangin Instruments would probably be the most direct competitor in the space currently, with former or active military starting a watch company, and for these two brands, Sangin and Winfield, at affordable prices. Probably the most famous one in this space would be Resco Watches, those guys have been around a long time now. But just like any other product, if there is a market, why not? Sangin produces a lot of great-looking watches, but the Winfield Apex and the Winfield lineup are definitely more original, as opposed to tweaks on homages of other brands. I am not saying these watches are completely new designs or there was no inspiration from other brands past or present (Mark Miller, owner of Winfield even states the original models were inspired by vintage military pieces), but I wouldn’t be able to look at these and point out another brand or model where these look identical.

    Winfield Apex

    The case design is very practical, with no highly polished parts anywhere, and everything is bead-blasted, including the stainless steel bezel insert. In my video, I state these are affordable Sinn or Damasko watches, and while they don’t actually look alike, one could see the similarities. But as I write this, I am thinking of Ares, another USA brand, started by the former military (I think the government as well in the case of Ares), now making very tool-oriented, rough, and tough watches with countdown timers. Most of the Ares watches are dive watches though, these are more field/pilot watches, though the Winfield Apex does have a screw-down crown and 100m water resistance. But Ares watches, even the quartz models, start at about $800 I believe. That is double what Winfield sells for.

    Winfield Apex

    In fairness, I have never had an Ares in hand, so I can’t comment on them other than what I have read about, but without first-hand experience, I don’t want to make assumptions. I will say though, quartz at $800 is pricey, even though I like the look of the Mission Timers a lot. But this Winfield Apex gives you a lot more than just another diver, and for many is probably a lot more practical. While you can’t take it to 2 or 300 meters, 100m is more than enough for most, and the screw-down crown and case back, with dual gaskets in each, will keep this piece dry. The crown is large, with very blocky crown guards protecting it from mountains, rocks, pavement, or like many of us desk divers, door knobs! The bezel is very secure and easy to rotate, with firm clicks and the red accent at the 12 o’clock pip that matches the red secondhand is welcome detail, and just enough pop of color to keep this piece from being too monochromatic.

    The dial is black and grey and is basically a reverse color combo of a previous Winfield model. Now grey is front and center, with a black outer ring for the Arabic numbers and a chapter ring for helping you keep track of your seconds. The bezel is fully indexed as well, so timing something with this watch should be a breeze. As you can see, the numbers are large, and 24-hour time is on the inner dial for those that like to keep track of that and to keep the dial as uncluttered as possible, this is a no-date dial. The only issue I have here is this is a standard NH35 movement, so you do have a phantom or ghost date wheel. If you are not familiar with that phrase, it means there are still two positions in the crown, one to set the date and one to set the time, yet there is no date on the dial. I would have loved to see them use a non-date NH movement, but at the price point, I am willing to overlook it.

    The Winfield Apex has a no-nonsense design, front, case, and back, and including the sapphire crystal (which to me is flat but it lists it as domed on the website), is only 13mm thick. *Correction, in the specs on the webpage it did list domed sapphire, which is probably fixed by now, but it does say correctly in the description flat sapphire* Now if you use the included Nato style straps, they will raise the watch up on your wrist a bit and these are 1.4mm nylon straps I believe these are made by UTE Watch Co (formerly Toxic Natos). These styles of straps or nylon straps in general are not really my style and never have been. With each watch, you get a Nato-style strap and a two-piece nylon, but you can not choose the colors. I was sent a few of them, so in this review you can see them in tan, green, and blue, but there are also a few other colors available on the website. I personally want to see these watches offered on canvas or really nice leather straps, and Mark says he is looking for a supplier but is being picky, so we will have to wait and see. Of course, with 20mm drilled lugs, if you have a bunch of straps, it shouldn’t be hard to put your favorite on this piece and go about your day.

    Winfield Apex

    I would say my only real letdown with the Winfield Apex would be the lume. Now in the photos below, the lume does look pretty bright, and the hands and large Arabic numbers do glow pretty well, but as you can see in the video, the smaller number and the logo not only look a paler green than the rest, but they also dim a lot faster as well. With these watches being produced by Lum-tec, I was hoping for better lume. Now, it is not horrible, it’s honestly above average still, but I was really expecting to be blown away by the lume, and I wasn’t. Again, I have high expectations.

    Winfield Apex

    With all the watches available these days, and all the microbrands, it can be hard to sift through them all and know which one is an actual good solid watch. I, of course, was sent these watches to review, so not being an actual customer can take some people out of what I say, and that is understood. While these watches are manufactured in Asia, like most microbrands, having Lum-Tec assemble and test them, as well as Mark and Lum-tec being able to handle repairs and CS, puts another notch on the belt for me. These watches are rugged, very solidly made, attractive, and again, the best part, well priced. Mark isn’t out there trying to use his name or what he did in the military to put more profit in his pocket. He wanted to make an affordable watch while still being one that can be used and abused and still look good. He definitely accomplished that in my opinion and the Winfield Apex is a great-looking model. The Apex is also available in all-black PVD as well, if you prefer an even more subdued look.

    Winfield Apex

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